Tag Archives: hiking

Waiting for the Endorphin to Kick In

Hi all,

Happy Thanksgiving.  My thoughts today for some unknown reason are not of our late afternoon feast where we disembody a turkey so we can add girth to our bodies, but rather when will my endorphins kick in and will I know it when they really do?

On my iPhone there is an App that is called Map My Hike.  I thought I would never end up inhabiting some of the same space that  our present day Millennials do, but believe me I haven’t gone so far as to wear one of those giant watches that will tell you all you might want to know about how well the old body is functioning.  At my age I will cast my lot with the old motto  “ignorance is bliss.”

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My iPhone startles me into the here-and-now, with the order Begin Workout.  I’ve got our 6 cow dogs all exited to get going but I wonder if they are a little perplexed as to when I traded my horse Fuzz for hiking poles?  I’ve decided to leave my coat at home so I won’t have any extra weight to carry.  And also it could give me reason to “weanie out” and  cut my hike short if I might possibly feel the slightest bit of discomfort.

I have to remind myself that there are two parts to today’s hike.  One is to keep mind and body from wearing a hole in my favorite recliner chair and the other is keep up the search for those elusive endorphins.  Sally, that’s the name I have given to the iPhone lady that startles me every time I pass a mile post.  Well, I have just been startled by Sally telling me I have put 1 mile behind me.  And what a mile it was, the wind was blowing enough to let the sissy side of me say “wish I had my coat” and just maybe this is reason enough to give up my search for those elusive endorphins and settle for my recliner.

Not on your life you “wimp!”  I’ll be off this windy ridge in a few more minutes and our Pine Canyon Lake will come into view.  It’s where I can sit a spell and count the ducks that use the lake as a resting place before they journey farther on to the South.  Here I am waiting for my endorphins to kick in when the real joy is in marveling at Mother Nature’s handy work.  I wonder about all these ducks that have just flown from Canada and Alaska to our lake.  Do you suppose they found their endorphins?

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I’m just about home now and Sally rings her bell and announces that I have just passed mile post 3 and my recliner is waiting in the living room.  I not sure if a peaceful easy feeling and a comfortable smile on my face spells endorphin but it’s close.   I hear the dinner bell ringing at our daughter’s house; it’s time to take in more calories than I used to fuel my hike.

It’s now Friday morning and my waistline has put on an inch or two. My phone rings and son John is on the other end. “What’s up John? Barbara and I and two of your granddaughters, Kathryn and Kayla, are going hiking want to go?”
“Where are you going to hike?” John says.  “On a part of the ranch you can only get too by walking?”
That intrigued me as I’m sure that I’ve ridden a horseback over every other acre on the V6.

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My, my , my, the views are absolutely spectacular as are my companions.  Who could ask for more?  The hike according to Sally was 3 miles again.  The value to my joyful place is immeasurable. Getting my 2nd wind sure feels good (endorphins), but plays second fiddle to a very satisfying Thanksgiving day and a radiant Friday.
See Ya
Jack

Comfortable Shoes

When I was young and in my prime I used to wear those traditional cowboy boots with the pointed toe and high heel.  At the top of each boot was a loop big enough to put your index finger into.  Then with some grunting, heavy breathing and pulling, your foot slipped into place just like a tongue giving a French kiss.  Back then, any cowboy worth his salt knew that this style of footwear allowed your foot to come out of the stirrup if your horse was really serious about bucking you off.  I was in the camp who knew that getting bucked of was more likely than staying on and the ground was going to greet me shortly.  With that in mind, I’d better be looking for the best place to land, and I didn’t want my foot hung up in the stirrup when I took my high-dive.

But no more!  Today I ride my friend Fuzz, who assures me that he doesn’t want to use all his energy to put me on the ground.  Besides, we have a mutual admiration for each other.  With hitting the ground no longer an issue, and no longer wanting to make a fashion statement, comfortable shoes with no point-to-the-toe here I come!  Today my toes can wander, no longer trapped inside like a bunch of folks squeezed into one of those high rise elevators in New York City.

I’m also finding pleasure riding a new horse who my daughter has loaned me for the spring cattle drives.  Bugs is closer to the ground, so gravity is not such a big issue.  I can throw my saddle on without having to grunt and groan.  Getting on a tall horse used to be a big event that required hunting for a log or a rock to stand on.  With Bugs, why, I can just get to his high side and hop on like I could in my younger years.  Yes, comfort is more important these days than the pain of breaking in new shoes.  My current shoes have take care of my feet for the past four years. They are so comfortable that they are going to get the call for almost any occasion.  Happy toes are more important to me than people’s opinions.  I mean the people who see me coming and whisper to each other that if that guy had just saved for his older years he wouldn’t have to wear those scruffy, comfortable shoes.
See Ya
Jack

 There’s Magnificence in Misery

Webster’s New World Dictionary defines magnificence as a state of richness and splendor.  Now I don’t know what I would find if I did a Goggle search for the definition, which I don’t know how to do anyway, so I’ll just stick with what Mr. Webster has to say on the subject.

Jack, you’re not inferring that we ought to get out of the shade and into the heat and feel a little pain?  YUP, just think of all the people who toil to the top of Mount Whitney and are rewarded with a rush of endorphins and a moment of absolute elation at what they have accomplished.  Now in my case, I get the same feeling but my exuberance factor might not be quite as high as theirs.  But my daily 2 mile toil up Middle Ridge on our ranch always leaves me with my second wind to enjoy and a sense of serene contentment.

Now the guy who owns a helicopter and lands his steed atop Mount Whitney gets out looks around and says, “yep quite a view” and hurries back to his chopper and heads for home with not one extra beat of his heart, nor any sign of sweat on his brow.  The question becomes: who do you want to trade places with?

I believe we need contrasting experiences in order to know when oh my God we’re in the toilet or when we’re skipping down the sunny side of the street.  I think we all ought to climb every mountain both physical and mental.  And we can take a helicopter joy ride now and then to add a little flavor to our lives.
See Ya
Jack.